Reflections

Cottage Reflection
Reflection

This morning, we decide to make the time to go for a walk. Where shall we go? Having not walked along Gott Bay for  more than a week, having had visitors, who wanted to explore the island, we set out after coffee. Our walk takes us along the road, and then on to the sand as soon as possible. In all we walk about 7 miles and thoroughly enjoy the autumn sunshine.

As we turn for home the Calmac Ferry, the ‘Lord of the Isles’, turns into Gott Bay. Although it must be over a mile away we decide to get the camera out. The sun is reflecting on the houses that face onto the Bay and it gets us reflecting on the past month.

Our first visitors have come and gone and we look forward to many more. It’s been three months since we made our exploratory expedition with Edith and Ronnie and  one calendar month since we arrived here.

We are becoming familiar with our surroundings. it is wonderful to be able to open the door and start walking to the pier or the small harbour at Scarinish. No background noise here unless you count the wind and the waves. We walk past the harbour most days when we visit the Co op.

Coffee Shops which we frequented on the mainline are not part of our life here. However last week we enjoyed visiting Chocolate and Charms and the Farmhouse Cafe with our visitors. We visited Blue Beyond Gallery as well to buy one or two small purchases before they close for the season.

We are experiencing some of the realities of life on the island. At least on two days the plane did not land and that meant no mail. Another day the boat could not cross to the island. We are having to wait for the arrival of the dentist!

On a different note we have so much appreciated the welcome we have received at Tiree Baptist Church. Sunday the 15th was a special day for us because that was the day we became members of that fellowship. We have been to their weekly prayer meetings and enjoyed the combined Bible Study with the Church of Scotland. It has been good to get to know people.

Ursula